22 7 / 2014

rosefire:

gaywitch-practisingabortion:

situationalstudent:

purplespacecats:

professorbutterscotch:

kiskolee:

THIS.

I have never thought about it in this context
that’s actually really, really creepy.

I… fuck.

Yeah, basically.

I once pointed this out to my mother and she just stared at me, in stunned silence for ages. 

There will always be a girl who is less sober, less secure, with less friends walking in a darker part of town. I want her safe just as much as I want me safe.

Oof. Word.

rosefire:

gaywitch-practisingabortion:

situationalstudent:

purplespacecats:

professorbutterscotch:

kiskolee:

THIS.

I have never thought about it in this context

that’s actually really, really creepy.

I… fuck.

Yeah, basically.

I once pointed this out to my mother and she just stared at me, in stunned silence for ages. 

There will always be a girl who is less sober, less secure, with less friends walking in a darker part of town. I want her safe just as much as I want me safe.

Oof. Word.

(Source: bigfatphallusy, via mykicks)

22 7 / 2014

(Source: dailybroadcity)

21 7 / 2014

princesconsuela:

What I said: Watch this show it’s really good
What I meant: For the love of God please watch this I need friends who understand my pain I need someone to talk about it with that hasn’t heard all my opinions a billion times please I am begging you

HAhaha this is definitely Natalie re: Buffy

(Source: rairatrio)

19 7 / 2014

dfordistressed:

sentimental-sanity:

clonesbians:

weloveshortvideos:

Guy’s Review of Right Guard Deodorant Ends Unexpectedly

image

This is GOLD

oooh my god lol

(via avocadosalad)

19 7 / 2014

miss-bambi-tails:

tanukigalpa:

rosalarian:

I think we could all use a tiny kitten on our screens from time to time.

ugh i love how his tail is just a triangle

IT’S TAIL IS A TRIANGLE

miss-bambi-tails:

tanukigalpa:

rosalarian:

I think we could all use a tiny kitten on our screens from time to time.

ugh i love how his tail is just a triangle

IT’S TAIL IS A TRIANGLE

(Source: dpaf, via avocadosalad)

18 7 / 2014

iammagicitself:

# still the best moment in a tv show ever

(Source: princesconsuela, via princesconsuela)

18 7 / 2014

sav3mys0ul:

retromantiqueRobin Wight 

Dandelions always remind me of Carl Sagan. I bet he’d have loved this.

(Source: apolonisaphrodisia)

16 7 / 2014

loquamani:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

You know, if people would start making interesting war movies, like this story, I might start watching them.

Yeah, this would actually make for a fairly fantastic movie…

loquamani:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

You know, if people would start making interesting war movies, like this story, I might start watching them.

Yeah, this would actually make for a fairly fantastic movie…

15 7 / 2014

arialenelove:

margaretthemagicdragon:

and my U.S. History teacher was trying to get us to understand why it was such a big deal that England had put a tax on colonial sugar, and he goes,

"What if you had to pay a tax every time you logged onto wifi?"

And the whole class just went

image

and I heard at least two people whisper “I would murder someone”

I will keep reblogging this in the name of historical science

(via avocadosalad)

15 7 / 2014

jenandtonic:

sotheresthat:

stereogum:

Jenny Lewis – “Just One Of The Guys” Video (Feat. Anne Hathaway, Kristen Stewart, & Brie Larson)

Well isn’t this just great? 

k stew in an adidas tracksuit is kind of the cutest

(via avocadosalad)